Category Archives: Homeschooling Methodologies

Find out about the various learning methodologies used by Secular, Eclectic, Academic Homeschoolers. SEA Homeschoolers does not recommend any homeschooling methodology except for the one that works for your unique child. You can learn more about what has worked and what hasn’t for others in our homeschooling community, including:

    • Project Based Learning
    • Worldschooling
    • Unit Studies
    • Classical Education
    • Literature Based (Charlotte Mason-style)
    • Handcrafted Education
    • Unschooling
    • Online Learning
    • Experiential Learning
    • Montessori
    • Waldorf
November 9th, 2015 by 

Homeschooling, The Early Years Written by Jill Harper I have been part of the online homeschool community for a number of years, and I often come across posts from a parent who is panicked about whether their young child or children are doing enough school work. Often the posts will list all the curriculum the parent has purchased and planned for the year and then go on to discuss how frustrated both the parent and the child are becoming with their school day. Sometimes the child becomes grumpy and uncooperative, sometimes the parent feels like all they are doing is …

November 9th, 2015 by 

A Day in the Life: Charlotte Mason Inspired Homeschool Every homeschooler wants to get a peek into another’s day. We’re always curious about how other mom’s manage. Maybe your homeschool tends toward very school-at-home, or classical, or project-based. We all picture every other homeschool mom as being a Pinterest-worthy super-mom, but really, we’re all pretty much the same – just doing our best to educate our children as well as we possibly can. This school year, I am teaching a 11th grader, two 8th graders and a 1st grader. My plate is FULL. I can honestly say, this has been …

November 6th, 2015 by 

The first time I thought about how others learn best was 40 years ago. I went to high school in Conroe, Texas, which is outside of Houston. Our Spanish teacher recruited several of us to volunteer with her church to assist migrant farmers who were illiterate and/or did not speak English. Our job was to help the men learn to read. Working with them was a powerful experience. It is rare for a young person to be made aware of how important knowledge is for adults who don’t have it. Even when parents push you to do well in school, …

September 28th, 2015 by 

Passion ignites learning. Much has been said about passion-based learning, but to us it simply means finding or creating as many learning opportunities and experiences to which we expose our son, making sure that he is challenged and engaged in a stimulating environment. What fascinates him and what doesn’t? What does he think about a learning activity? We employ one gentle rule: “Try it once or twice and then decide if you want to pursue it or not.” This way, we communicate the message that we respect his decision in the end, but after urging him to be open to …

September 9th, 2015 by 

Yellowstone National Park, Montana On Silent Wings, Owls I love owls! Owls get me thinking about the natural selection that must have taken place for a bird to be a successful nighttime predator. From an evolutionary standpoint, it makes sense that a bird would evolve to fill the niche of flying nighttime predator. It’s the steps to getting there that fascinate me. What do you think came first silent flight, superior hearing, or the ability to see well in the dark? The parks we have stayed in had ranger talks every night. The owl talk at Yellowstone National Park was …

September 1st, 2015 by 

Dinosaur National Monument Park, Utah Isn’t it fascinating to think of dinosaurs roaming Earth? Maybe giant nautilus, small trilobites, or huge aquatic dinosaurs such as the plesiosaur swam on land you are now standing on. With its layer upon layer of fossils, walking through Dinosaur National Monument Park will make you think of things like that. When were dinosaurs in this area and when was this dry, arid landscape covered in water? The Principle of Superposition states: In a series of layered sedimentary rocks the oldest layer is at the bottom and the youngest layer is at the top. ~ …

August 31st, 2015 by 

Making Our Own Eclectic Learning Brew At five years old, our son came up to me one day and said, “Mama, I love the taste of knowledge!” I knew from then on that our learning adventure would be an exciting one. Our special blend of learning How does one customize a learning path that is considerate of the distinct personality, abilities, asynchrony, overexcitabilities and multi-potentialities that exist in each child? What do you do when no single method, program or curriculum fit your child, your family values and your overall vision of what you consider “quality education?” You make your …

August 18th, 2015 by 

Great Basin National Park, Utah This was our viewing spot for the Perseid meteor shower. It was nearly a perfect location. Nice and dark with no light pollution, which is what stargazers call the artificial lights that make it hard to view astronomical events. We started 10th grade on August 12th, 2015 by getting on the road. It might seem arbitrary to choose a date since we homeschool, but why not? 🙂 When we travel, we include history and science as a part of the journey. Over the next month I will be posting regular science and history information from …

August 10th, 2015 by 

“I am, I can, I ought, I will.”* If you’ve been homeschooling for any amount of time, chances are you’ve heard the name Charlotte Mason. She has made quite a name for herself in the modern homeschool movement, despite the fact she lived over a hundred years ago. Charlotte Mason (1842 – 1923) was a British educator who advocated for improving the quality of education for children. She promoted the idea of a “liberal education for all” not just those of a certain social class. If you’ve ever searched for Charlotte Mason inspired curriculum or information, you probably found a …

June 23rd, 2015 by 

Sitges, Spain, the Antipope of Peniscola The present castle in Peniscola was built by the Knights Templar from 1294 to 1307. It looks like a prime piece of real estate that would be easy to defend. From 1415 to 1423 it was home of the antipope Benedict XIII. Wait…antipope? What is an antipope? An antipope (Latin: antipapa) is a person who, in opposition to the one who is generally seen as the legitimately elected Pope, makes a significantly accepted competing claim to be the Pope,[1]the Bishop of Rome and leader of the Roman Catholic Church. At times between the 3rd …

June 21st, 2015 by 

There Were Mammooths in Andalusia Sean woke me up early. “Mom, I have broken out in a bad rash, or bites, or something all over!” Well, that will get a mother up and going! We could not figure it out. No one else had any bumps. Could it be that Sean was allergic to the detergent used when we washed clothes, or maybe it was the 30 to 40 nispero (fruits from the tree in the backyard) he ate over the course of 1&1/2 days? We still are not sure. In two itchy, scratchy days they were gone. It did get …

June 20th, 2015 by 

The Alhambra in Daylight When you buy tickets for the Alhambra you have to choose between the morning or afternoon. We chose afternoon because the morning session started at 8 a.m.  We had yet to even be awake once that early in the morning. The problem with that is the temperature. It had been warm in the afternoons all week. Still we were glad we chose the afternoon. We were all enjoying waking late every morning. Over the past few months in the States there have been many news stories about African refugees trying to come to Europe. We had …

June 19th, 2015 by 

Granada Spain Must Have some Homeschoolers In It The kids were ready to get to Granada. The house we were staying at there had a pool, and they wanted to swim in it. It had been warm and sunny for the past three days, definitely swimming weather.    Jim spotted this on the way there. I wonder if asparagus is transported like this everywhere? Spain has the best produce. The Spanish are proud of this too. Organic food and food that has not been genetically modified are the norm not the exception. When they get rid of weeds from between …

June 18th, 2015 by 

Seeing Seville on an Electric Bike and Flamencoa The Flying Dutchmen told us what a blast they had riding around Seville on a Segway. We called every Segway rental company we could find on the Internet and they were all booked. I looked on TripAdvisor to make sure we had not missed any Segway companies and what came up as the number one outdoor activity in Seville was the Electric Bicycle not the Segway. I called Elecmove Electric Bikes (If you are wondering, I use TripAdvisor a lot when we travel.) and they were able to fit us in. We …

June 17th, 2015 by 

Our Man of La Menthe, Seville, and the Flying Dutchmen We woke up in the hostel after a very good night’s sleep. The woman we met last night was at the front desk. She was wonderfully friendly. She did not speak English, so it was all very basic Spanish from me as she explained that her son was working in London. I believe he is head of security at a clinic there. He loves London. She is very proud of him but thinks it is too bad so many young people are leaving Spain to find better jobs elsewhere. This …