High School Writing with How Would You Rule?

High School Writing with How Would You Rule?

Do you like to argue? Are ethical puzzles fun to work through? Then you’ll love Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? which puts you in the judge’s seat for some of the weirdest legal cases ever.

We’ll read several chapters from the book and use them for live discussions and writing activities of a variety of lengths and complexities.

Learners will write four, multi-draft essays and receive supportive, meaningful feedback that challenges them to find their own writing style and craft academic writing effectively and engagingly.

Class Duration: February 1-April 25

Class Size: 3-8 learners

Age Range: 14-18

Total Price: $155

This is a live class with weekly face-to-face meetings via Zoom. The live meetings will provide an opportunity for discussion and for students to ask questions. Most of the actual work of the class, however, takes place independently between live sessions.

Students will receive assignments each week that are due by the start of the following week. They will receive individual feedback and interact with one another through discussion boards.

Class content consists of reading assignments, reading guides, video instruction, quizzes, short writing prompts, and four multi-draft essays.

Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? is a collection of real-life court cases that stumped judges and had some strange outcomes. We’ll use these essays to discuss some themes of ethics, logic, and argument.

Students will practice writing the following types of essays:

–A closing statement on behalf of the defense or prosecution in a case

–A piece of creative writing examining the precision of words

–A sample contract on a fictitious business or personal agreement

–A textual analysis using quotes from the reading to analyze the interplay between ethics and the law

This is a robust class that will include lots of meaningful, contextualized writing practice. It is designed to help prepare writers for the kind of assignments they will encounter in college classrooms, but it will be scaffolded to meet learners where they are.

The feedback for this class is very detailed. For all papers, learners will receive a personalized video giving advice on how to revise for the final draft. All final drafts receive written feedback. Those who successfully complete all major assignments in this class will receive a letter of completion that is suitable for inclusion in high school transcripts.

Upon enrollment, you will receive a form to fill out about other preferences including whether or not you would like to receive numeric grades in the class.

February 1-April 25 with live meetings on Tuesdays from 11-11:45am Eastern/10-10:45am Central/9-9:45am Mountain/8-8:45am Pacific

Texts: A copy of Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? (a used copy is fine; a library copy can be used, but the class is easier if learners can write in their books)

To interact in class: A camera (recommended) and microphone (highly recommended) to meet live via Zoom. Class takes place on Teachable, so a stable internet connection is necessary. Many materials are in PDF form, so a PDF reader is needed. We will have class discussions on Discord.

For assignments: Written work can be submitted through Microsoft Word or through Google Docs in a Google Drive folder.

Usually 3-5 hours per week of work; length may vary based on reading/writing speed

Some writing skills (ability to craft 2-3 paragraphs on a single topic)

Some reading skills (ability to decode unfamiliar words through context, ability to make connections between ideas over multiple chapters)

Development of a personal writing process

Familiarity with strategies for the higher order concerns of writing (main idea, organization, development, and comprehension)

Familiarity with strategies for the lower order concerns of writing (formatting, style, and mechanics)

Note taking and using outside sources to craft papers

Revising writing over multiple drafts

Synthesizing ideas from multiple sources and mediums

Aligns with the following Common Core Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1, 9-10.2, 9-10.3, 9-10.4
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1 A-E, 9-10.2 A-F, 9-10.3 A-E, 9-10.4, 9-10.5, 9-10.9 B, 9-10.10
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.1, 9-10.2, 9-10.3, 9-10.4, 9-10.5, 9-10.6
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1, 11-12.2, 11-12.3, 11-12.4
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1 A-E, 11-12.2 A-F, 11-12.3 A-E, 11-12.4, 11-12.5,
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.11-12.1, 11-12.2, 11-12.3, 11-12.4, 11-12.5, 11-12.6

The feedback on the papers is based largely on the learner’s current skills. Basically, I do my best to make the class challenging without being overwhelming for all learners.

Families and learners are welcome to share any information about their individual learning preferences and needs and instructor will make accommodations that are helpful to the class.

This book includes cases that deal with criminal activity including murder and assault. The descriptions are not graphic. There are some chapters in the book (which we are not reading) that deal with sexual content including nudity.

See this teacher’s policies on things like refunds, missing class, and behavioral expectations. (Click here to see the policies.)

More Classes Like this One

High School Writing with How Would You Rule?

Do you like to argue? Are ethical puzzles fun to work through? Then you’ll love Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? which puts you in the judge’s seat for some of the weirdest legal cases ever.

We’ll read several chapters from the book and use them for live discussions and writing activities of a variety of lengths and complexities.

Learners will write four, multi-draft essays and receive supportive, meaningful feedback that challenges them to find their own writing style and craft academic writing effectively and engagingly.

Class Duration: February 1-April 25

Class Size: 3-8 learners

Age Range: 14-18

Total Price: $155

This is a live class with weekly face-to-face meetings via Zoom. The live meetings will provide an opportunity for discussion and for students to ask questions. Most of the actual work of the class, however, takes place independently between live sessions.

Students will receive assignments each week that are due by the start of the following week. They will receive individual feedback and interact with one another through discussion boards.

Class content consists of reading assignments, reading guides, video instruction, quizzes, short writing prompts, and four multi-draft essays.

Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? is a collection of real-life court cases that stumped judges and had some strange outcomes. We’ll use these essays to discuss some themes of ethics, logic, and argument.

Students will practice writing the following types of essays:

–A closing statement on behalf of the defense or prosecution in a case

–A piece of creative writing examining the precision of words

–A sample contract on a fictitious business or personal agreement

–A textual analysis using quotes from the reading to analyze the interplay between ethics and the law

This is a robust class that will include lots of meaningful, contextualized writing practice. It is designed to help prepare writers for the kind of assignments they will encounter in college classrooms, but it will be scaffolded to meet learners where they are.

The feedback for this class is very detailed. For all papers, learners will receive a personalized video giving advice on how to revise for the final draft. All final drafts receive written feedback. Those who successfully complete all major assignments in this class will receive a letter of completion that is suitable for inclusion in high school transcripts.

Upon enrollment, you will receive a form to fill out about other preferences including whether or not you would like to receive numeric grades in the class.

February 1-April 25 with live meetings on Tuesdays from 11-11:45am Eastern/10-10:45am Central/9-9:45am Mountain/8-8:45am Pacific

Texts: A copy of Daniel Park’s book How Would You Rule? (a used copy is fine; a library copy can be used, but the class is easier if learners can write in their books)

To interact in class: A camera (recommended) and microphone (highly recommended) to meet live via Zoom. Class takes place on Teachable, so a stable internet connection is necessary. Many materials are in PDF form, so a PDF reader is needed. We will have class discussions on Discord.

For assignments: Written work can be submitted through Microsoft Word or through Google Docs in a Google Drive folder.

Usually 3-5 hours per week of work; length may vary based on reading/writing speed

Some writing skills (ability to craft 2-3 paragraphs on a single topic)

Some reading skills (ability to decode unfamiliar words through context, ability to make connections between ideas over multiple chapters)

Development of a personal writing process

Familiarity with strategies for the higher order concerns of writing (main idea, organization, development, and comprehension)

Familiarity with strategies for the lower order concerns of writing (formatting, style, and mechanics)

Note taking and using outside sources to craft papers

Revising writing over multiple drafts

Synthesizing ideas from multiple sources and mediums

Aligns with the following Common Core Standards:

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1, 9-10.2, 9-10.3, 9-10.4
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1 A-E, 9-10.2 A-F, 9-10.3 A-E, 9-10.4, 9-10.5, 9-10.9 B, 9-10.10
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.9-10.1, 9-10.2, 9-10.3, 9-10.4, 9-10.5, 9-10.6
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1, 11-12.2, 11-12.3, 11-12.4
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1 A-E, 11-12.2 A-F, 11-12.3 A-E, 11-12.4, 11-12.5,
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.11-12.1, 11-12.2, 11-12.3, 11-12.4, 11-12.5, 11-12.6

The feedback on the papers is based largely on the learner’s current skills. Basically, I do my best to make the class challenging without being overwhelming for all learners.

Families and learners are welcome to share any information about their individual learning preferences and needs and instructor will make accommodations that are helpful to the class.

This book includes cases that deal with criminal activity including murder and assault. The descriptions are not graphic. There are some chapters in the book (which we are not reading) that deal with sexual content including nudity.

See this teacher’s policies on things like refunds, missing class, and behavioral expectations. (Click here to see the policies.)

More Classes Like this One