Letter from the Editor May 2018: Happy Almost Summer Everyone!

I have a story I want to share with you. My 18 year-old son, homeschooled since first grade, wanted a summer job. He gave it some thought, looked at what was out there for an 18 year-old and decided he wanted to apply for a job as a sous chef.

“What?” I asked in shock. “You have never shown even the slightest inclination to learn how to cook, despite me trying everything I could think of to change your mind.”

“Well,” he replied, “If I get this job, your desire to have a son who knows how to cook will be answered.”

So, he went and interviewed at a restaurant he thought he would like working at. He felt like the interview went well. They told him they would get back to him. They were looking for someone with some experience, so my husband and I told him even with a good interview he might not get the job. When they didn’t call him back in a couple of days, he called the restaurant and asked if he could come in and work for half a shift so they could see that even though he didn’t have experience he was a fast learner and good at paying attention.

The restaurant owners liked his attitude and had him come in. You will not be surprised to find out that he got the job. He started three weeks ago, and he loves it.  He even cooked for me on Mothers’ Day!

Homeschooled children are fearless about their ability to learn new things.

This, to me, is such a homeschooled kid story. When I pointed out to him that he couldn’t cook, my son responded by telling me he knows how to learn what he doesn’t know.  Then when the owners didn’t call him back, he called them and asked them to give him a try, because he also believed he would be able to learn what they needed him to. It is a trait of homeschooled kids to be fearless about their ability to learn new things. They grow up understanding that they can learn anything through doing. These are the most important traits of a lifelong learner and very common traits of homeschooled kids.

Homeschooled children grow up understanding that they can learn anything through doing.

My guess is, this year, you had some parts of your homeschool journey that were stellar, some that were mediocre, and some that didn’t work well. We did too. I also know it can be hard to evaluate how your journey is going to turn out from the beginning or middle of it. As long as you kept your eye on what really mattered, and I believe you did (even if you aren’t sure), one day you will realize you raised an individual who can tackle anything he or she sets his or her mind to, because your child has an intimate connection with the unique way he or she learns. And once a person know that, anything is possible.

The view of Mono Lake from The Mono Inn

Much Love,

I hope to see you in Atlanta,

Blair

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